Gen-I Challenge: NB3FIT Day with Gen-I & NB3 Foundation

Healthy Kids! Healthy Futures! Generation Indigenous and Notah Begay III Foundation team up for NB3FIT Day.

nb3fitFINALThe Center for Native American Youth (CNAY) and Generation Indigenous (Gen-I) are proud to announce a new partnership with the Notah Begay III Foundation (NB3F)! Both CNAY and the NB3 Foundation have teamed up for a Gen-I Youth Challenge initiative promoting youth-led physical fitness and wellness efforts across Indian Country. The Challenge, “NB3FIT Day”, will be held on Sunday, November 13, 2016!

NB3FIT Day is a national day of inspiration, learning, and physical movement to support the health and fitness of Native American youth. CNAY and NB3F are encouraging tribes, Native communities, Gen-I Ambassadors, Gen-I Challenge takers, and other Native youth to organize and host activities that will inspire youth to participate in physical activity. The goal for NB3FIT Day is to engage 10,000 Native youth in physical activity for a minimum of one hour on November 13.

For more information about NB3FIT Day, visit www.nb3foundation.org/event/nb3fit/#geni


For Native Youth: To register your youth-led Gen-I Challenge Event for this national day of health and fitness in Indian Country, please fill out the following form:

Gen-I Youth Challenge Event Registration GEN-I Logo_New-250px

Others: To register your community organized event, please fill out the Event Registration form.


 

Reminder: Apply to Attend the 2016 White House Tribal Nations Conference by August 22!

Gen-I + CNAY partnership logo_new

Greetings!

For the third consecutive year, the Obama Administration is inviting a diverse group of Native American youth (ages 14-24) from across the country to participate in the 2016 White House Tribal Nations Conference on September 25-27 in Washington, DC. The annual conference provides youth with the opportunity to join elected officials from the 567 federally recognized tribes in engaging directly with the President and members of his cabinet. Click here to watch video of President Obama’s conversation with Native youth at last year’s White House Tribal Nations Conference.

The White House is inviting Native youth who are part of Generation Indigenous (Gen-I) to apply to attend this year’s conference. Don’t worry if you are not yet a part of Gen-I, there’s still time to take the Gen-I Challenge! Interested youth must submit an online application by 11:59pm PST on August 22 to be eligible to attend. Additional details about the conference, including conference dates and agenda, will be released at a later date. Eligibility requirements are outlined below.

To be eligible, Native youth (ages 14-24) must meet the following criteria (***Please see this FAQ to help with any questions you might have):

  • Complete an online application – which includes taking the Gen-I Challenge and writing a brief essay (applicants will be judged on the strength of their application) by August 22, 2016 at 11:59pm PST;
  • Be enrolled in a federally recognized tribe (to check if your tribe is federally recognized, click here);
  • Be available to travel to Washington, DC for the conference;
  • Be able to raise funds to support your own travel, lodging and meals for the conference; and
  • If under 18 years-old, be able to secure an adult chaperone (over the age of 18) and necessary funding for chaperone travel, lodging and meals.

Interested youth must submit an online application by 11:59pm PST on Monday, August 22, 2016. Similar to the 2015 White House Tribal Youth Gathering, this opportunity is self-funded, so youth participants will be responsible for raising the funds necessary for travel, lodging and meals. Do not book airfare or lodging until you have been notified that you have been selected to attend. If you have any questions, please email cnayinfo@aspeninstitute.org or call (202) 736-3577.

Sincerely,

Center for Native American Youth

Gen-I NOW 8-17: Native American Political Leadership Program

(Ni je na?) (How are you? in the Potawatomi language)!

This Gen-I Native Opportunities Weekly (NOW) message shares information about the Richard M. Milanovich Fellowship and the Native American Political Leadership Program.
NAPLP
The Richard M. Milanovich Fellowship began in 2015 as a partnership between The George Washington University and the Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians with two goals in mind: to prepare the next generation of leaders in Indian County, and to honor and preserve the legacy of service and leadership of the late Tribal Chairman Richard M. Milanovich. The George Washington University and the Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians invite qualified Native American applicants to apply for this prestigious opportunity.

ELIGIBILITY:

  • Native American undergraduate or graduate students who are members of a federally recognized tribe are eligible to apply for the Milanovich Fellowship.
  • Applicants who are members of a federally recognized California tribe will be given preference by the Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians review committee.

TO APPLY:

  • Applicants applying for the Richard M. Milanovich Fellowship must submit an application for the Native American Political Leadership Program,
  • An additional 350 word essay answering, “What do you believe are the most important issues that Native communities are confronted with today, and how do you see yourself in the equation of solving these issues?”

DEADLINE:
Spring Semester 2016 Application Deadlines:

  • Priority Deadline: October 1, 2016
  • Final Deadline: November 1, 2016

For more information, including additional instructions, guidelines, essay questions and any additional questions please visit the Richard M. Milanovich Fellowship web page.

CNAY Attends Training on Community Organizing

13876515_10153926184482476_4994793843368017469_nCNAY staff attended the Native Organizers Alliance, a project of People’s Action Institute, in Seattle, Washington.

The training was geared to Natives who are organizing in Indian Country, in rural, reservation or urban communities. It was a four-day intensive workshop that covers building people-power, campaign planning, community led policy change, and how to use our stories to win struggles, all through a cultural and traditional lens. This training was an opportunity to strengthen Indian Country’s organizing infrastructure through relationship building, peer support and coordination with other Natives who are doing community organizing. The workshop helped prepare organizers for leading a community-driven campaign on the issues and concerns that are relevant to Indian Country. For more information about the training, visit: http://www.nativeorganizing.org/.

Spotlight: CNAY Youth Ambassador Kamea Clark

Meet Kamea Clark, 2016 CNAY Youth Ambassador

Kamea headshot.2
Kamea Clark is 14 years old and from the Ute Mountain Ute Tribe in Towoac, Colorado. Kamea won best student film at the LA Skins Fest – the largest Native American Film Festival in the world – for her contributions to ESCAPE, a short film on bullying and suicide on the Ute Mountain Ute reservation.

Kamea helped produce an anti-drug public service announcement for the Center for Disease Control, and worked on the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Service Administration (SAMHSA)’s Veto Violence Campaign in 2015.

Kamea wants to continue to expand her education in film in order to help other Native girls explore careers in filmmaking and media. She plans to form a group of emerging youth leaders to be mentored and trained by speech teachers, public speakers, and behavioral health professionals in order to effectively present their films at school assemblies. Her goal is to reach at least 5,000 youth each year through her films.

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In search of the 2016 class of Champions for Change, the Center for Native American Youth (CNAY) received more Champions for Change applications than ever before. Although we can only select five Champions, the CNAY team and review committee were deeply inspired by the stories youth shared through their essay and video application submissions. Our Founder and Chairman, former US Senator Byron Dorgan, created the CNAY Youth Ambassador role to recognize the incredible leadership of all applicants. Acknowledging these Ambassadors aligns with CNAY’s efforts to elevate positive stories from Indian Country.

2016 White House Tribal Nations Conference Application is Open!

For the third consecutive year, the Obama Administration is inviting a diverse group of Native American youth (ages 14-24) from across the country to participate in the 2016 White House Tribal Nations Conference in late-September in Washington, DC (exact date TBD). The annual conference provides youth with the opportunity to join elected officials from the 567 federally recognized tribes in engaging directly with the President and members of his cabinet.

The White House is inviting Native youth who are part of Generation Indigenous (Gen-I) to apply to attend this year’s conference. Don’t worry if you are not yet a part of Gen-I, there’s still time to take the Gen-I Challenge! Interested youth must submit an online application by 11:59pm PST on August 22 to be eligible to attend. Additional details about the conference, including conference dates and agenda, will be released at a later date.

To be eligible, Native youth (ages 14-24) must meet the following criteria (***Please see this FAQ to help with any questions you might have):

  • Complete an online application – which includes taking the Gen-I Challenge and writing a brief essay (applicants will be judged on the strength of their application) by August 22, 2016 at 11:59pm PST;
  • Be enrolled in a federally recognized tribe (to check if your tribe is federally recognized, click here);
  • Be available to travel to Washington, DC in late-September for the conference (exact dates will be announced in the coming weeks);
  • Be able to raise funds to support your own travel, lodging and meals for the conference; and
  • If under 18 years-old, be able to secure an adult chaperone (over the age of 18) and necessary funding for chaperone travel, lodging and meals.

Interested youth must submit an online application by 11:59pm PST on Monday, August 22, 2016. Similar to the 2015 White House Tribal Youth Gathering, this opportunity is self-funded, so youth participants will be responsible for raising the funds necessary for travel, lodging and meals. Do not book airfare or lodging until you have been notified that you have been selected to attend.

If you have any questions, please email cnayinfo@aspeninstitute.org or call (202) 736-3577.

FAQs: White House Tribal Nations Conference Youth Participation

2016 White House Tribal Nations Conference

Frequently Asked Questions

ABOUT THE WHITE HOUSE TRIBAL NATIONS CONFERENCE

What is the White House Tribal Nations Conference (WHTNC)?

The White House Tribal Nations Conference is a convening that brings together leaders of the 567 federally recognized American Indian tribes to meet with representatives of the White House Administration and federal agencies to discuss important issues affecting tribal communities and strengthen nation-to-nation relationships. This year will mark the eighth White House Tribal Nations Conference, and the third time Native youth have been invited to formally participate in this event.

Where will the WHTNC be held?

The White House Tribal Nations Conference will be held in Washington, DC. More details will be shared with those selected to attend the conference.

When will the WHTNC take place?

This year, the White House Tribal Nations Conference will take place in late-September. More details will be shared with those selected to participate in the event.

Who is eligible to apply to attend?

To be eligible to apply to attend the White house Tribal Nations Conference, Native youth between the ages of 14 and 24 years old must a) be an enrolled member of a federally recognized tribe; b) take or have already taken the Gen-I Challenge (everyone will have to describe their Gen-I Challenge activities) c) apply online by 11:59 pm PST on August 22, 2016.

ABOUT GENERATION INDIGENOUS

What is Gen-I?

Gen-I is short for Generation Indigenous, a broad and inclusive movement initiated by President Obama to remove barriers between Native youth and their success. The launch of Gen-I consisted of several initiatives to better support Native youth including: new Native Youth Community Projects; a National Native Youth Network; the release of the White House Native Youth Report; a Cabinet Listening tour in which Cabinet secretaries visited various communities in Indian Country; and the first-ever White House Tribal Youth Gathering in 2015. Click here to learn more about Gen-I.

What is the Gen-I Challenge? 

The Gen-I Challenge is a pledge to do something positive in your Native community and it serves as your entry point to the Gen-I National Native Youth Network. To accept the Gen-I Challenge, youth must 1) ACT – Do something to positively impact your tribal or urban Indian community; 2) CAPTURE photo or video of you taking positive action; and 3) SHARE your Gen-I Challenge story and photos/videos with the Center for Native American Youth through a brief online form. Once you’ve taken the Gen-I Challenge, you can become more involved as a Gen-I Ambassador. Being an Ambassador means that you’ll share everything you learn from the Gen-I Network with other youth in your community. It’s that simple!

APPLYING TO THE WHITE HOUSE TRIBAL NATIONS CONFERENCE

Why should I apply to attend the White House Tribal Nations Conference?

President Obama and the current White House Administration have made Native youth a priority in a number of ways, including extending the invitation to attend the White House Tribal Nations Conference to Native youth. The WHTNC is an opportunity to share your perspective as a young tribal member among hundreds of tribal leaders, federal agency representatives, and members of the White House Administration. It is important that Native youth take advantage of opportunities like these to have your voice heard by policy and decision-makers whose work directly affects you, your families, and communities.

How do I apply to attend the White House Tribal Nations Conference?

Native youth who meet all eligibility criteria must apply online to attend the White House Tribal Nations Conference. The application requires you to describe your Gen-I Challenge activities and share your thoughts on the importance of Generation Indigenous to you, your tribal community, and you in Indian Country as a whole.

When is the application deadline?

In order to apply to attend the White House Tribal Nations Conference, applicants must meet all eligibility criteria and submit a complete application by 11:59 PM Pacific Time on August 22, 2016. Late applications will not be considered.

When will I know whether or not I’ve been selected to attend the White House Tribal Nations Conference?

Youth will be notified of their application status as soon as possible after the close of the application.

QUESTIONS ABOUT THE APPLICATION

Do I need to fill out the whole application?

Yes. Only those who submit a full application will be eligible to attend. Each youth will be judged by the strength of their overall application.

What if I already took the Gen-I Challenge?

That is completely fine. You will simply need to describe your Gen-I Challenge activities and upload any photos that capture you in action.

What if I haven’t take the Gen-I Challenge?

This is your opportunity to do so! In the appropriate box, describe actions that you plan to take to improve your community.

What if I am a descendant of more than one tribe?

Please list the federally recognized tribe you are enrolled on your application. This opportunity is only available to youth enrolled in federally recognized tribes.

What if I don’t have a working phone number?

If you do not have a phone number of your own, please list the phone number of a parent or guardian who can help us get in touch with you regarding your application. Please note that if you are selected to attend the White House Tribal Nations Conference, we will need to be able to reach you by phone to communicate event updates and in case of emergency.

What if I’m younger than 14 or older than 24?

This opportunity is only open to youth between 14 and 24 years old.

When is the application deadline?

August 22 at 11:59pm PST.

What does PST mean?

PST means Pacific Standard Time.

AFTER SELECTION

If selected, what will my role be at the White House Tribal Nations Conference?

If selected to attend the White House Tribal Nations Conference, you will participate in the conference and in breakout sessions alongside tribal leaders, in addition to youth-specific programming to prepare you for conference participation. A complete agenda will be shared with selected youth at a later date.

Is funding available for selected youth to attend the White House Tribal Nations Conference?

The White House Tribal Nations Conference is a self-funded opportunity. We suggest reaching out to tribal office and others in your community to raise funding to support your travel expenses.

Should I book my trip immediately?

No. Do not book any travel accommodations until after being notified that you have been selected to attend.

Do I need a chaperone if I’m under 18?

Yes. Youth under the age of 18 MUST be accompanied by a chaperone.

Will my chaperone be able to attend the White House Tribal Nations Conference?

Chaperones will participate in the WHTNC with youth, however, chaperones may not have access to all of the WHTNC events in which youth participate. Chaperones should be prepared to sit out for some conference activities and should not assume that they will receive the same clearance credentials as selected youth participants.

If you have any questions, please contact cnayinfo@aspeninstitute.org or call (202) 736-3577.

Native Americans in Philanthropy to partner with White House’s Generation Indigenous Initiative

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Native Americans in Philanthropy to partner with White House’s Generation Indigenous Initiative

August 2, 2016

(Minneapolis, MN) – Native Americans in Philanthropy (NAP) is honored to partner with the White House on a Generation Indigenous (Gen-I) philanthropic event, “Generation Indigenous: Raising Impact with Innovation and Proven Strategies” on August 26, 2016, at the White House. This event calls upon the philanthropic community to take action to elevate key issues and address the pressing needs of Native youth with culturally comprehensive approaches to ensure all Native youth reach their full potential.

“Native people have endured a long history of racism and colonialism which has led to multi-generational, community historical trauma. Despite the diversity in language, location, and economic distinctions, there is structural and systematic discrimination that affect all Native communities. Annual grant funding has remained below 0.5%, yet Native Americans are 1.7% (5.4 million) of the total US population. This event will highlight impact driven solutions and opportunities to partner with philanthropy,” stated Sarah Eagle Heart, CEO of Native Americans in Philanthropy.

Recent statistics show that 81% of Native men and 84% of Native women experience violence in their lifetime. Suicide is the second highest cause of death of Native youth between the ages 15 and 24 — who make up over 40% of the total Native population — and at a rate that is 2.5 times the national average. Native youth are placed in the criminal justice system at a rate up to 5 times that of whites, receive disproportionately harsh treatment, and are more likely to be killed by police than any other racial group. Additionally, Native Americans are often categorized in data and reports as “statistically insignificant” or “other,” erasing their existence and unique circumstances; as a result, services and policies inherently leave Native people behind in social and economic advancement.

Gen-I seeks to improve the lives of Native youth by promoting a national dialogue, policies, and programs to mobilize and cultivate the next generation of Native leaders. Generation Indigenous: Raising Impact with Innovation and Proven Strategies will celebrate Native-led and Native-driven promising practices and spur more philanthropic commitments towards the meaningful support of Native youth. The event will feature presentations by ten storytellers of innovation and success that are selected by a panel of youth judges and key philanthropy partners. Story-based presentations will be assessed by the following criteria: exemplify innovative approaches; address gaps and disparities; champion community assets; implement cultural competency; the leadership reflect the community served; and impact on Native youth. Storytellers must submit a full application by Wednesday, August 10, 2016, at 5:00 p.m. (EST). More information regarding the application and how to submit can be found at here.

Key philanthropy partners include Casey Family Programs, W.K. Kellogg Foundation, Philanthropy Northwest, Forum of Regional Associations of Grantmakers, and CHANGE Philanthropy. Invited participants will engage with Native changemakers and leaders who are making a difference with Native youth. Beyond the event, NAP is seeking grantmakers to heed the Call to Action to partner regionally with Native youth and communities, support and develop Native leadership, and invest in the kinds of innovative and promising solutions presented by the storytellers. Respond to the Call to Action here.


About Native Americans in Philanthropy

Native Americans in Philanthropy (NAP) is a twenty-six year old nonprofit organization promoting equitable and effective philanthropy to achieve a vision of healthy and sustainable Native communities. NAP members include philanthropy (mainstream and tribal), tribal programs, Native nonprofits, national networks and individual changemakers dedicated to collectively improving equity and well-being for Native peoples across the United States. Follow us on Facebook and LinkedIn at Native Americans in Philanthropy and on Twitter @NativeGiving. Become a member of NAP by visiting www.nativephilanthropy.org for more information.


About Generation Indigenous

President Obama launched the Gen-I Initiative at the 2014 White House Tribal Nations Conference to focus on improving the lives of Native youth by removing the barriers that stand between Native youth and their opportunity to succeed. Through new investments and increased engagement, this initiative takes a comprehensive, culturally appropriate approach to ensure all young Native people can reach their full potential.

Any inquiries regarding the event and application process can be directed to GenerationIndigenous@nativephilanthropy.org.

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Contact:
Jennifer Fairbanks
Communications Specialist
612.724.8798
jfairbanks@nativephilanthropy.org

Generation Indigenous Native Education Ideas Competition

partnership logo

Every Native student deserves a high-quality education and Native youth themselves are the experts when it comes to improving our education system. That’s why the Center for Native American Youth and National Indian Education Association have teamed up to launch the Gen-I Native Ed Ideas Competition.

This online ideas contest is an opportunity to showcase your ingenuity in addressing the biggest challenges facing Native students today. Tell us what educational issues you’re most passionate about, and share your plan for improving outcomes for Native learners. You could win a chance to present your big idea at the 47th Annual NIEA Convention and Trade Show among hundreds of educators, advocates and policymakers!

Eligibility:
Contestants must meet all of the following criteria to be eligible to participate:

  • Must identify as American Indian, Alaska Native, and/or Native Hawaiian;
  • Must be between the ages of 18 and 26 years old;
  • Must currently live within the United States;
  • If selected, must commit to travelling to Reno, Nevada, to participate in the entire NIEA conference, taking place October 5-8; and
  • If selected, must commit to presenting their winning idea during an NIEA conference session.

Application
To participate, contestants must write an original essay that responds to the following prompts in 500-750 words:

  1. What is your biggest priority related to education and Native students? Why is this issue important to you?
  2. In the next 50 years, what do you want your education systems to look like? 
  3. What is your big idea you’d like to share that could help achieve the vision outlined in your response to Question #2?
    • What innovative resource or tool would you create?
    • Are there new laws or guidelines you would recommend to improve school climate or academic outcomes? We encourage you to get creative!
    • Who should be involved in creating and implementing your resource, tool or initiative?
    • How will your proposed resource, tool or initiative address the issue outlined in Question #1?
    • Who will benefit from this idea, and how?

CLICK HERE TO APPLY ONLINE

The deadline to submit your essay HAS BEEN EXTENDED TO 11:59pm Eastern Time on Monday, August 29, 2016.

Award
Finalists with the most innovative ideas will be awarded a travel and registration scholarship to attend the 2016 NIEA conference in Reno, Nevada, and will present their big idea to conference participants alongside CNAY staff.

Contestant Notifications
Contestants will be notified of their final competition status by September 8, 2016.

For questions or more information, contact the Center for Native American Youth at cnayinfo@aspeninst.org or (202) 736-3577.